Adverse Possession Guide

Adverse Possession Image

Did you know, under certain circumstances, a trespasser can come onto land, occupy it, and gain legal ownership of it through adverse possession? As crazy as it sounds, adverse possession, sometimes referred to as squatter’s rights are just that. Adverse possession is a legal principle under which a person who does not have legal title to a property acquires legal ownership based on the continuous occupation of the property.

This article is the ultimate guide for adverse possession. Within it, we will discuss adverse possession, examples of adverse possession, and the five elements of adverse possession. Keep reading to find out what your state’s adverse possession law is.

What is Adverse Possession?

Definition: Adverse possession is a legal principle under which a person who does not have legal title to a property acquires legal ownership based on the continuous occupation of the property.

If successful in proving adverse possession, the person or parties are usually not required to pay the owner for the land.

Who are Squatters and What is Squatting?

The people or parties occupying property while having no title are called squatters. Squatting is the act of continuous occupation, while adverse possession is the principle in which squatters obtain ownership. Squatting tends to occur when people who are poor and homeless find empty buildings and occupy it; however, this is not always the case.

Generally speaking, there are different types of squatting, while most people think squatters are all homeless; that is definitely not the case. Some people may technically be squatting and not even realize it.

What is an Example of Adverse Possession?

The most well-known examples of adverse possession are someone homeless finding an empty building and living in it for years. Eventually, trying to earn ownership, however, that rarely actually happens. More common examples of adverse possession occur through little things like continuous use of a private road or driveway, or agricultural development of an unused parcel of land.

Often homeowners believe they have title to use a portion of property connected to theirs and might even pay taxes on it. However, maybe after a set of new neighbors move in, they realize they never actually owned. Through adverse possession, they can claim that portion of the property if they can meet the requirements.

What are the Five Elements of Adverse Possession?

In the US, there are five federal requirements that must be met before a legal claim for possession can be made. The five elements of adverse possession are as they follow:

Occupation of the property must be:

  1. Hostile: The person seeking adverse possession is doing so without permission of the owner. Obviously if the owner gave permission adverse possession would not be necessary.
  2. Actual: The person seeking adverse possession must have physical possession.
  3. Open & Notorious: The person seeking adverse possession must occupy the property in a manner that is open and obvious.
  4. Exclusive: The property must be occupied exclusively by the person seeking adverse possession.
  5. Continuous: All elements must be met at all times through the statutory period (this period is defined state by state).

If the squatter does not meet these five requirements, they cannot make an adverse possession claim. Additional requirements of adverse possession vary state by state.

What States Allow Adverse Possession?

Adverse possession law varies from state to state, so it’s essential to read and understand your state’s laws. Some states do not explicitly define their stance on adverse possession while others do, so keep that in mind when you read down below.

State laws are constantly changing, while we strive to make sure all of our material is up to date as possible, please contact an attorney or conduct your own legal research to verify the state laws you are researching.

Here are all 50 states and their adverse possession laws:

Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California
Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia
Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa
Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland
Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri
Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey
New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio
Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina
South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont
Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming

 

Adverse Possession Alabama

Statutory Period for Possession in Alabama

In Alabama, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years or if they’ve paid property taxes for the land for at least ten years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Alabama?

In Alabama, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. However, squatters have a much easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

Alabama Adverse Possession Statute: Alabama Code 6-5-200

Adverse Possession Alaska

Statutory Period for Possession in Alaska

In Alaska, anyone openly possessing a parcel of property under color of title for at least seven years, or at least ten years under good faith (meaning they thought that the land was already part of their property), may claim that property.

Color of title refers to a claim to title that appears valid but may be legally defective.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Alaska?

In Alaska, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. However, squatters have a much easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

Alaska Adverse Possession Statute: Alaska Statute 09.10.030, 09.45.052

Adverse Possession Arizona

Statutory Period for Possession in Arizona

In Arizona, anyone openly possessing a parcel of property under color of title for at least three years, may claim that property.

Color of title refers to a claim to title that appears valid but may be legally defective.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Arizona?

In Arizona, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. However, squatters have a much easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes (five year minimum).

Arizona Adverse Possession Statute: Arizona Revised Statute 12-522

Adverse Possession Arkansas

Statutory Period for Possession in Arkansas

In Arkansas, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for seven continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Arkansas?

In Arkansas, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property (seven year minimum).

Arkansas Adverse Possession Statute: Arkansas Code 18-11-106

Adverse Possession California

Statutory Period for Possession in California

In California, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for five continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in California?

In California, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property (five year minimum).

California Adverse Possession Statute: California Code of Civil Procedure 325 18-11-106

Adverse Possession Colorado

Statutory Period for Possession in Colorado

In Colorado, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for eighteen continuous years or if they’ve paid property taxes for the land for at least seven years with color of title.

Color of title refers to a claim to title that appears valid but may be legally defective.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Colorado?

In Colorado, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. However, squatters have a much easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

California Adverse Possession Statute: Colorado Revised Statute 38-41-101, 38-41-108

Adverse Possession Connecticut

Statutory Period for Possession in Connecticut

In Connecticut, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for fifteen continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Connecticut?

In Connecticut, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Connecticut Adverse Possession Statute: Connecticut Statute 52-575

Adverse Possession Delaware

Statutory Period for Possession in Delaware

In Delaware, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Delaware?

In Delaware, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Delaware Adverse Possession Statute: Delaware Code Title 10 – 7901

Adverse Possession Florida

Statutory Period for Possession in Florida

In Florida, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for seven continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Florida?

In Florida, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property (seven year minimum).

Florida Adverse Possession Statute: Florida Statute 95.12

Adverse Possession Georgia

Statutory Period for Possession in Georgia

In Georgia, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Georgia?

In Georgia, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Georgia Adverse Possession Statute: Georgia Code 44-5-161

Adverse Possession Hawaii

Statutory Period for Possession in Hawaii

In Hawaii, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Hawaii?

In Hawaii, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Hawaii Adverse Possession Statute: Hawaii Revised Statute 657-31.5

Adverse Possession Idaho

Statutory Period for Possession in Idaho

In Idaho, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Idaho?

In Idaho, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Idaho Adverse Possession Statute: Idaho Code 5-210

Adverse Possession Illinois

Statutory Period for Possession in Illinois

In Illinois, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years or if they’ve paid property taxes for the land for at least seven years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Illinois?

In Illinois, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. However, squatters have a much easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

Illinois Adverse Possession Statute: Illinois Statute 13-101

Adverse Possession Indiana

Statutory Period for Possession in Indiana

In Indiana, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Indiana?

In Indiana, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Indiana Adverse Possession Statute: Indiana Code 32-23-1-1

Adverse Possession Iowa

Statutory Period for Possession in Iowa

In Iowa, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Iowa?

In Iowa, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Iowa Adverse Possession Statute: Iowa Code 614.17A

Adverse Possession Kansas

Statutory Period for Possession in Kansas

In Kansas, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for fifteen continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Kansas?

In Kansas, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Kansas Adverse Possession Statute: Kansas Statute 60-503

Adverse Possession Kentucky

Statutory Period for Possession in Kentucky

In Kentucky, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for fifteen continuous years or with proof of color of title seven years.

Color of title refers to a claim to title that appears valid but may be legally defective.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Kentucky?

In Kentucky, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Kentucky Adverse Possession Statute: Kentucky Statute 413.010

Adverse Possession Louisiana

Statutory Period for Possession in Louisiana

In Louisiana, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Louisiana?

In Louisiana, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Louisiana Adverse Possession Statute: Louisiana Laws Civil Code CC 3473

Adverse Possession Maine

Statutory Period for Possession in Maine

In Maine, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Maine?

In Maine, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Maine Adverse Possession Statute: Maine Revised Statute 14, 801

Adverse Possession Maryland

Statutory Period for Possession in Maryland

In Maryland, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Maryland?

In Maryland, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Maryland Adverse Possession Statute: Maryland Annotated Code 5-103

Adverse Possession Massachusetts

Statutory Period for Possession in Massachusetts

In Massachusetts, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Massachusetts?

In Massachusetts, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Massachusetts Adverse Possession Statute: Massachusetts General Law – Part III, Title V, Chapter 260, Section 21

Adverse Possession Michigan

Statutory Period for Possession in Michigan

In Michigan, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for fifteen continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Michigan?

In Michigan, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Michigan Adverse Possession Statute: Michigan Compiled Laws 600.5801

Adverse Possession Minnesota

Statutory Period for Possession in Minnesota

In Minnesota, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for fifteen continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Minnesota?

In Minnesota, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property (five year minimum).

Minnesota Adverse Possession Statute: Minnesota Statute 541.02

Adverse Possession Mississippi

Statutory Period for Possession in Mississippi

In Mississippi, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Mississippi?

In Mississippi, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Mississippi Adverse Possession Statute: Mississippi Annotated Code 15-1-13

Adverse Possession Missouri

Statutory Period for Possession in Missouri

In Missouri, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Missouri?

In Missouri, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Missouri Adverse Possession Statute: Missouri Annotated Statute 516.010

Adverse Possession Montana

Statutory Period for Possession in Montana

In Montana, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for five continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Montana?

In Montana, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property (five year minimum).

Montana Adverse Possession Statute: Montana Code Annotated 70-19-411

Adverse Possession Nebraska

Statutory Period for Possession in Nebraska

In Nebraska, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Nebraska?

In Nebraska, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Nebraska Adverse Possession Statute: Nebraska Revised Statute 25-202

Adverse Possession Nevada

Statutory Period for Possession in Nevada

In Nevada, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for fifteen continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Nevada?

In Nevada, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property (five year minimum).

Nevada Adverse Possession Statute: Nevada Revised Statute 40.090

Adverse Possession New Hampshire

Statutory Period for Possession in New Hampshire

In New Hampshire, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in New Hampshire?

In New Hampshire, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

New Hampshire Adverse Possession Statute: New Hampshire Revised Statute 508:2

Adverse Possession New Jersey

Statutory Period for Possession in New Jersey

In New Jersey, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for thirty continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in New Jersey?

In New Jersey, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

New Jersey Adverse Possession Statute: New Jersey Revised Statutes 2A:14-30

Adverse Possession New Mexico

Statutory Period for Possession in New Mexico

In New Mexico, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in New Mexico?

In New Mexico, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. While there are a few exceptions squatters almost always have an  easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

New Mexico Adverse Possession Statute: New Mexico Statutes 37-1-22

Adverse Possession New York

Statutory Period for Possession in New York

In New York, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in New York?

In New York, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

New York Adverse Possession Statute: New York Real Property Laws 501 – 511

Adverse Possession North Carolina

Statutory Period for Possession in North Carolina

In North Carolina, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years or with proof of color of title seven years.

Color of title refers to a claim to title that appears valid but may be legally defective.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in North Carolina?

In North Carolina, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

North Carolina Adverse Possession Statute: North Carolina Statute 1-38, 1-40

Adverse Possession North Dakota

Statutory Period for Possession in North Dakota

In North Dakota, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years or if they’ve paid property taxes for the land for at least ten years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in North Dakota?

In North Dakota, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. However, squatters have a much easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

North Dakota Adverse Possession Statute: North Dakota Title 28 Chapter 1

Adverse Possession Ohio

Statutory Period for Possession in Ohio

In Ohio, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty-one continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Ohio?

In Ohio, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Ohio Adverse Possession Statute: Ohio Revised Statutes 2305.04

Adverse Possession Oklahoma

Statutory Period for Possession in Oklahoma

In Oklahoma, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for fifteen continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Oklahoma?

In Oklahoma, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Oklahoma Adverse Possession Statute: Oklahoma Statutes Title 12 – 93

Adverse Possession Oregon

Statutory Period for Possession in Oregon

In Oregon, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Oregon?

In Oregon, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Oregon Adverse Possession Statute: Oregon Revised Statutes 105.620

Adverse Possession Pennsylvania

Statutory Period for Possession in Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty-one continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Pennsylvania?

In Pennsylvania, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Pennsylvania Adverse Possession Statute: Pennsylvania General Assembly Title 42-5530

Adverse Possession Rhode Island

Statutory Period for Possession in Rhode Island

In Rhode Island, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Rhode Island?

In Rhode Island, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Rhode Island Adverse Possession Statute: Rhode Island Title 34 Chapter 34-7

Adverse Possession South Carolina

Statutory Period for Possession in South Carolina

In South Carolina, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in South Carolina?

In South Carolina, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

South Carolina Adverse Possession Statute: South Carolina Code of Laws Title 15 Chapter 67

Adverse Possession South Dakota

Statutory Period for Possession in South Dakota

In South Dakota, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years or if they’ve paid property taxes for the land for at least ten years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in South Dakota?

In South Dakota, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. However, squatters have a much easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

South Dakota Adverse Possession Statute: South Dakota Law Chapter 15-3

Adverse Possession Tennessee

Statutory Period for Possession in Tennessee

In Tennessee, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for seven continuous years with color of title or if they’ve paid property taxes for the land for at least twenty years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Tennessee?

In Tennessee, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. However, squatters have a much easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

Tennessee Adverse Possession Statute: Tennessee Code 28-2-101

Adverse Possession Texas

Statutory Period for Possession in Texas

In Texas, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years, or three years if they hold color of title.

Color of title refers to a claim to title that appears valid but may be legally defective.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Texas?

In Texas, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. While there are a few exceptions squatters almost always have an easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

Texas Adverse Possession Statute: Texas Civil Remedies Code Sec. 16.024

Adverse Possession Utah

In Utah, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for seven continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Utah?

In Utah, squatters are required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property (seven year minimum).

Utah Adverse Possession Statute: Utah Code 78B-2-208

Adverse Possession Vermont

Statutory Period for Possession in Vermont

In Vermont, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for fifteen continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Vermont?

In Vermont, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Vermont Adverse Possession Statute: Vermont Statute 12 – 501

Adverse Possession Virginia

Statutory Period for Possession in Virginia

In Virginia, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for fifteen continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Virginia?

In Virginia, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Virginia Adverse Possession Statute: Virginia Code 8.01-236

Adverse Possession Washington

In Washington, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years or if they’ve paid property taxes for the land for at least seven years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Washington?

In Washington, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. However, squatters have a much easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

Washington Adverse Possession Statute: Washington Statute 4.16.020

Adverse Possession West Virginia

Statutory Period for Possession in West Virginia

In West Virginia, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in West Virginia?

In West Virginia, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

West Virginia Adverse Possession Statute: West Virginia Code 55-2-1

Adverse Possession Wisconsin

Statutory Period for Possession in Wisconsin

In Wisconsin, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for twenty continuous years or ten years if they hold color of title.

Color of title refers to a claim to title that appears valid but may be legally defective.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Wisconsin?

In Wisconsin, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property. However, squatters have a much easier time gaining property ownership with proof of property taxes.

Wisconsin Adverse Possession Statute: Wisconsin Statute 893.25

Adverse Possession Wyoming

Statutory Period for Possession in Wyoming

In Wyoming, squatters can make an adverse possession claim if they have occupied the land or building for ten continuous years.

Do Squatters Have to Pay Property Taxes in Wyoming?

In Wyoming, squatters are not required to show proof that they have paid their property taxes to gain ownership of the property.

Wyoming Adverse Possession Statute: Wyoming Statute 1-3-103

Author:
Zackary Smigel is a real estate professional with a love for teaching, based out of Pittsburgh, PA. He's had the opportunity to work with some of the brightest minds in real estate and has spent years learning how to become a successful agent.